Meta Data
Draft: 
No
Revision of previous policy?: 
No
Effective Start Year: 
2018
Scope: 
National
Document Type: 
Plan/Strategy
Economic Sector: 
Power
Energy Types: 
Power
Issued by: 
Government of the Republic of the Marshall Islands
Overall Summary: 
The Navigating our Energy Future: Marshall Islands Electricity Roadmap provides a strategic framework for the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) electricity sector, to enable the RMI Government to meet the climate change targets and to strengthen our role as a climate leader. This Roadmap will allow the RMI and its development partners to work together to achieve a common vision for the RMI electricity sector. Geographically, the Roadmap covers all of the RMI, and considers three types of systems: a) Main grids of Majuro and Ebeye; b) Mini-grids (e.g. Jaluit, Wotje, Rongrong, Kili); and c) Individual solar home systems or stand-alone power systems. For different stages along the pathway to net zero emissions the analysis identified the technologies suitable for use in the RMI, the appropriate mix of renewable generation and enabling technologies, and opportunities for supply and demand side efficiency.
Access
Energy access priorities: 
There is a pressing need to increase the service reliability of all systems, and to explore the aspirations of outer islanders for energy services and the role of energy in rural development.
Efficiency
EE priorities: 
We need to switch the compensation for easements from free electricity to some other form, such as a direct payment, to remove the disincentive to conserve power and to encourage energy efficiency.
EE standards for appliances: 
There are many possible measures for energy efficiency and conservation – only some of these require consideration as policies: [...] Mandate the purchase of Energy Star (or similar energy rated labelling) appliances for all government agencies (‘soft’ internal government policy). [...] Prescribe air conditioning temperature set points for government agencies (‘soft’ internal government policy).
EE lighting and mechanical system standards: 
There are many possible measures for energy efficiency and conservation – only some of these require consideration as policies: [...] A ban on incandescent lightbulbs.
EE labeling: 
There are many possible measures for energy efficiency and conservation – only some of these require consideration as policies: [...] Minimum energy performance standard (MEPS) and appliance labelling scheme.
EE building standards: 
There are many possible measures for energy efficiency and conservation – only some of these require consideration as policies: Ensure building code focus on energy efficiency. [...]
Renewable Energy
RE targets: 
One of the targets is therefore to cross a technical threshold by 2025, enabling our major grids of Majuro and Ebeye to run in ‘diesel-off’ mode. This means that sometimes during the day, at particular times of year, while the sun is shining and the wind is blowing, we will be running on 100 percent renewable energy.
RE action plans: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Consider standards for imported equipment, and the licensing of installers. [...] Provide a statement to development partners that small rooftop solar systems in urban grid areas are outside RMI priorities (beyond the existing loan scheme noted above). [...] Include the integrity of roof structures in the revised Building Code, with a view to supporting PV installations, especially on larger roofs.
RE feed-in tariffs: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Signal that there will continue to be no net metering or feed-in tariff for Majuro and Ebeye, to inform the investment decisions of individuals and organizations.
Net metering: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Signal that there will continue to be no net metering or feed-in tariff for Majuro and Ebeye, to inform the investment decisions of individuals and organizations.
RE capital subsidy, grant, or rebate: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Provide a statement to development partners that small rooftop solar systems in urban grid areas are outside RMI priorities (beyond the existing loan scheme noted above).
RE reductions in taxes: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Continue the import tax exemption for solar PV panels but do not actively promote it.
Mandatory connection: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Continue the MEC technical rule that rooftop solar cannot be connected to, or feed into the grid. Establish a similar rule for KAJUR.
Pricing
Energy pricing: 
Affordable electricity, both for consumers and for the RMI Government, is a key objective of this Roadmap. While renewable energy can reduce fuel costs, we must fully recognize and plan for the increased costs of maintaining and replacing equipment. Affordability must consider equity issues and different users’ ability to pay. --- Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Signal that there could be a tariff review to ensure partially self-sufficient users are paying a fair price for being able to access the network, to better inform their future investment decisions. --- Electricity tariff and subsidy setting: The combination of tariffs and subsidies should be set to provide for the long-term financial sustainability of MEC and KAJUR, including allocation of future capital needs, while at the same time ensuring affordability to users.
Energy Supply and Infrastructure
Energy mix: 
To achieve the RMI’s NDC, the electricity sector must reduce diesel use by at least 50 percent below 2010 levels by 2025, and 65 percent by 2030, assuming that other sectors also achieve the reductions indicated in the NDC. --- Assuming progress is made converting outer island mini-grids to renewables, to meet our targets, Majuro and Ebeye should each reduce diesel consumption from 2010 levels by at least 48 percent by 2025, 64 percent by 2030, and 100 percent by 2050
Infrastructure development priorities: 
Our intended measures for private solar PV are: [...] Increase reliability of the grid, and build public confidence in the grid, so people are less likely to seek alternatives as backup.